3 Tips for Infographics That Get the Job Done

Infographics have become enormously popular in recent years as companies and marketers try to draw more eyeballs to their content.

Like any other content marketing technique, there are many examples of both excellent and awful infographics. Here are three tips to help you avoid becoming the latter.

the topic of your infographic should focus like a laser

1. Focus like a laser.

Infographics are meant to make one specific point and serve a specific purpose. Don’t use them just to throw a lot of information at the audience!

Decide exactly what your infographic is for and what you want the audience to do with the information. Include the data that will help achieve those goals, and leave out what doesn’t.

infographic text should be simple as abc

2. KTSS (Keep Text Simple, Stupid)!

One of the principles behind infographics is that a picture is worth a thousand words. Unfortunately, too many people tend to forget this “graphic” part of “infographic.”

Words should be kept to a minimum. If you do include text in your infographic, word it simply. The font should be clear and legible, both in size and style.

with infographics keep audience in mind

3. Put your audience first.

Yes, those dancing birds in your infographic are eye-catching and adorable. But do they actually help the audience understand the data you’re sharing? Will they encourage your audience to take the desired action? If not, then maybe leave them out.

It’s tempting to add cute, clever, or eye-popping elements to an infographic “just because.” You might feel compelled to include some non-vital information because it seems interesting. Keep in mind, however, that you’re creating the infographic for the audience, not yourself. Design it with them in mind, using elements that will best serve and relate to THEM.

Like a good infographic, there’s a pattern to these tips. Know the audience and keep them at the forefront when creating an infographic. Make sure your data and your purpose are clear. The infographic should be every bit as clear and specific as it is creative and compelling.

As always, thanks for reading. if you’ve found this post to be helpful, or know someone who could benefit from it, share away!

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